Using a masonry drill mess free !

Posted in Gardening/household tips, household/gardening tips, how to features on May 18th, 2015 by John Coxon

 

When drilling into brick walls with a hammer drill and masonry “bit” the drilling will throw out very, very  fine brick dust and plaster dust which is hard to clean up and brushing or vacuuming it away never seems to work entirely  so you are going to need a damp cloth, or are you? Why not collect the dust just under the hole you are drilling!

Use this simple tip to collect the brick dust effortlessly as you drill and save a cleaning job !

post-it notelet

All you need is a “Post -it” mildly sticky note-let which you put a fold in,  place and press it on directly  under where you are going to drill.

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The brick-dust will fall into the groove you made with the fold and when you have completed the hole simply carefully peel off and use the note-let to wrap and dispose of the dust – simple !

I hope you find this helpful and if so browse through previous gardening and household tips entries here or why not visit my Facebook for more ideas and photos  as well as links to my photography business Facebook page  and my Twitter. Thank you.

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How to ease sticking wooden drawers for pence !

Posted in Gardening/household tips, household/gardening tips, how to features on May 18th, 2015 by John Coxon

I have an old Victorian “tall boy” set of drawers which I was given and stripped down to bare pine some twenty years ago and it’s  still in daily use.

But the large drawers , full of clothes and bedding had become tight and awkward to open and close so they needed easing. Unlike easy to open modern drawers with  metal or plastic runners , antique wooden drawers are  essentially shelves and   fitted with guiding battens and with age the drawer underside rubbing on that narrow surface  all those years can get harder to open and shut because there is not enough friction . Wax, simple candle wax is the effective way to ease those drawers acting as a solid lubricant.

Standard candles are not as effective for this simple job as the common or garden tea light candle available from Ikea for what works out as 4.5 pence each. They come in shallow thin circular aluminium pots which are easy to remove to expose the wax top and bottom surfaces. I used a pair of scissors to cut down one edge and then simply peeled the aluminium away. tea light

 

tea light

The underside of the naked tea light candle has a small disc of metal which holds the wick.

tea light

 

When using the tea light candle to lubricate the drawers use the top surface of the tea light.

Within the carcass of the chest of drawers you can see where the wood that bears the weight of each drawer by the wear marks simply rub the tea light up and down that strip of wood getting plenty of wax on each.

tea light as lubricant

 

 

next repeat rubbing , this time the underside edges of the drawers which rub against the battens within the carcass.

tea light

Replace and reload the drawers and see how much easier they are now to open and close.

Tip : I used scented tea lights and they of course are perfumed so the old drawers smell sweet not age musty !

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