PR & MARKETING SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY – THE LOW DOWN

i tri harderclick on any image to enlarge

I pride myself on thinking for myself and yet  acting ethically and responsibly  as a self regulating independent free lance photographer. I pride myself on doing my very best for my clients, doing whatever it takes to get original great quality images.  I want to meet their needs whether its helping promote a brand or an athlete’s  career and media presence or promote a clients other interests and also give them a lasting record of their achievements. To do that  you have be flexible, versatile , be able to think on your feet, improvise and try to think out of the box, defy collective “wisdom”, have faith in your own judgements, defy  conventions where necessary and break the rules now and again . I have boundless energy and enthusiasm and love my work.  I try to come at a subject from another angle and often that is a low one getting down wet and dirty!

I’ve never been a slave to convention and never want to be. I aim to keep my approach fresh to get maximum impact from images.  When it comes to sport there are so many opportunities to capture the thrills and spills, the agony and the ecstasy and drama  and if I am lucky I can do that with few restrictions .

I am laying in the muddy grass lakeside shooting with a wide angle lens up at swimmers with a wide angle lens coming out of the lake to get a more dramatic shot.

I am laying in the muddy grass lakeside shooting with a wide angle lens shooting up at swimmers  coming out of the lake to get a more dramatic shot.

THE RULES OF ENGAGEMENT- YOU CAN’T  ALWAYS GET THE SPOT YOU WANT TO GET THE BEST SHOTS.

International events rarely come with carte blanche in terms of access for professional photographers ; the media accreditation process has, sadly , become more and more exclusive and sometimes nepotistic.  With big agencies  paying large sums for access rights that  creates an artificial “pecking order”  amongst photographers where, for example, the event’s official photographer (or increasingly photographers) have access all areas in front of all others. All others face restrictions in terms of where they can stand. It is inevitable that it is harder for those restricted professionals  to get original shots when they are all standing in precisely the same spot while the elite can roam freely and get the headline gravy shots with relative ease. Global agenices staffers virtually monopolised the Olympics. With print media syndication often the same key shots from Olympic events appeared everywhere leaving very little of the market left to non agency freelancers. (Anyone who was lucky enough to get media accreditation had to sign an agreement not to use any images from the games for anything other than editorial media use. I was horrified by that)

RSA 's Oscar Pistorius super athlete  & my ultimate sports and human being role model flying past me on the way to 400m gold Parlaympic World Cup Manchester

RSA ‘s Oscar Pistorius superb athlete & my ultimate sports and human being role model flying past me on the way to 400m gold Parlaympic World Cup Manchester

With the increasing presence of professional event organising companies , their PR people often choose the key photography spots at events. They create media “pens” from spectator barriers and have a system of differentiating by bib colours as well as media tag credentials. Usually the privileged few get the red bib and the rest green or blue. ( That makes it easy to spot anyone over stepping the mark  and you risk being ejected if you are caught)  You get the feeling they  want to discourage originality, prevent you from earning your living  and are  certainly looking after the interests of companies and agencies who are paying them.  But in fact it is just market forces, your reality, like it or not, and  best bite the bullet and get on with the job and accept that is the way it is.

Swiss triathlete joyfully completes an Ironman half marathon with gold in Sherbourne & then comes down to earth - her feet all bleeding blisters- one tough cookie.

Swiss triathlete Sybie Matter  joyfully completed a Half Ironman  with gold in Sherbourne & then comes down to earth – her feet all bleeding blisters- one tough cookie.  Concern, respect  and interest in athletes as people  is what I think I demonstrate in my work

Whilst creatively it is OK to be unconventional and a bit of a rebel , as a professional you have to remain just that,  professional and disciplined and work within imposed constraints with good grace and you need to bear in mind that if you bend the rules too much you are going to get ejected from the event and possibly black listed. For the shot of Oscar above, the media pen was to the left of  the finish line where I was happy to stand with my peers most of the time but as long as you didn’t get in anyone’s way or put any of the athletes at risk you could stand behind the spectator barriers anywhere around the perimeter of the running track. I had a lot of shots , taken with a 200m zoom of Oscar running at me in the pen towards the finish or past me from a previous meet but I didn’t think any of those images did him justice.

Had spoken to Oscar several times- so likable & genuine- fans from the RSA wanted a shot with their hero & happy to ask him  & set it up for them.

Had spoken to Oscar several times- so likable & genuine- fans from the RSA wanted a shot with their hero & happy to ask him & set it up for them.

How could I get the shot I wanted? Before this big race I wondered over to an empy area of seating on the far side of the Sports City stadium just off the first bend in the circuit. No security or event officials in that space and so I found myself down on the ground, parted the barrier slightly , lay down with my wide angle ready arms head and upper body  on the edge but not on the track and waited.  It takes Oscar about 20 metres to get into full stride so this was the ideal spot to get the shot I wanted  as he flew past in all his focused glory. I actually printed off the shot twice- gave one to Oscar later as a gift souvenir and he kindly signed the other for me. ( with a totally positive mind set and background as an inner city  special educator  I don’t like or use the word “disability” and I focus , in my work , on the athlete and the person whatever their ability and aim to record and celebrate their strengths and achievements in images)

 

laying flat on a pontoon to get as low as possible to get a shot that looks like I was in the water with the athletes.

laying flat on a pontoon to get as low as possible to get a shot that looks like I was in the water with the athletes.

In many events the finish line is key spot but always the space in front of it  is restricted for broadcast media photography professionals. Most photographers are similar height and huddled together in rows in a confined space you just do what you can. If you happen to be working for a client athlete, often that shot is the one they really want , especially of the win.

( In the sports photography arena all have too defer to broadcast media because they reach the largest audience through the medium of video and for the evennt organisers they are the elite because through them they get maximum exposure.  But how often have a group of us cursed some steady cam cowboy bouncing around the finish line of a race completely oblivious to all the photographers behind him whose line of sight he is blocking!)

Pretty much anywhere else on a outdoor race course you are  not so restricted or always packed in so , with a very early start, you should, as I do, survey the entire course and select places  you can get a range of decent shots  that will meet the clients needs or be attractive to fans to purchase.

GETTING OVER THE ACCESS RESTRICTIONS  – rising above it all !

My first major international sports event was in my own city and I was there as the city’s official photographer for the 2004 Triathlon World Cup but even that role didn’t give me universal access as the event was managed by the International Triathlon Union and its chosen event management people. In a long ,long shift, (where it rained and drizzled  throughout and was cold) , I was able eventually to present the city’s tourism and marketing director with some nine hundred great images from the day. The only thing I didn’t manage was to get a clear shot of the winner , elite male or female, crossing the finish line with the tape raised but I quickly learned from that experience and never made the same mistake again!

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LOOKING AT THINGS FROM A DIFFERENT ANGLE.

I was pretty naïve back then and it shows in this shot I got ( above ) of my now client and friend GB’s World Champion and Olympian Michelle Dillon winning the race back in 2004 but had never met her at that point. One like that is never going to make the front page of a newspaper or magazine but it taught me a valuable lesson.  I covered the same event in subsequent years and found unique way around the problem and amazed no one else thought of it. (Some photographers carry a set of folding step ladders with them but that wasn’t practical and likely to cheese off spectators if you blocked their view so I like to travel light and improvise)

The  ITU Triathlon World Cup races always ended on the Lowry Plazza in front of the prestigious Lowry Centre and Lowry Designer Outlet (retail heaven?) and here local knowledge and original thinking came into play plus shall we say taking a calculated risk ! The Outlet entrance is reached by a flight of stone steps with a circular raised terrace in front of various bars. I had checked in early on the day and realised that I could stand on the wall directly facing the finish line even though there was a twelve foot drop in front of me. There was a chrome rail on the wall and , as the race was ending I took my place, standing and wrapping my legs around the rail to steady myself. I had enough elevation and my 200 mm zoom with me to actually see and shoot over all the other photographers compressed in the pen and bingo I nailed it in both the women’s and the men’s race.

Shooting from up high over spectators and media photographers penned in below.

Shooting from up high over spectators and media photographers penned in below.

these are the shots you need to get to make headline pages. Right place right time.

these are the shots you need to get to make headline pages. Right place right time.

Getting event and location indicators in the shot & good timing help too. That's why the tape is so big .

Getting event and location indicators in the shot & good timing help too. That’s why the tape is so big .

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There is always a huddle to get in front of the podium after a race or game and again you may be restricted- in my experience increasingly you are with the podium area taped or roped off and all the photographers made to shoot behind the tape some twenty feet back while the “official” photographer is again free to roam. Usually, but not always,  they are professional enough to get out of the way of others when they have got the shot they need. You need to talk or shout to the subjects as it is best if they are all looking your way so my self-confidence and innate sociability comes in handy here. Getting central  and low down is ideal but that rule has its dangers as I was about to find out back in 2004 in Sallford !

Bless the races patron Sir rocco Forte for the champagne but never thought what might happen next !

Bless the race’s patron Sir Rocco Forte for the champagne but never thought what might happen next !

Sir Rocco Forte,  the outstanding hotel entrepreneuer is also an outstanding age group triathlete and was patron of the 2004 World Cup. Such is his admiration and respect for the elite athletes he decided to introduce a Formula 1 Motor Racing twist to the ceremony which had never been done before. Michelle and Miek here struggled a bit to get the corks out but finally managed the champagne shower . Unfortunately, as I had the prime spot , low and central directly in front of them I got a champagne shower too and so did my camera.

In wet conditions always keep checking your lens is dry and clean- relatively new to all this , working on adrenaline took me some time to realise my lens was smeared with champagne droplets making subsequent shots look blurred.

In wet conditions always keep checking your lens is dry and clean- relatively new to all this , working on adrenaline took me some time to realise my lens was smeared with champagne droplets making  the first few subsequent shots look blurred.

After the elite presentations I stuck around and later the presentations were made to the age groupers, the club athletes. (I was the only photographer who bothered to stick around and record that. ) I make it a rule to get there early and be one of the last to leave- do not want to miss a thing.

I always arrive really early ay venues to survey for the best spots - here I was dawn at Dorney Lake National Rowing Centre soaking in the vibe.

I always arrive really early at venues to survey for the best spots – here I was, dawn at Dorney Lake National Rowing Centre, soaking in the vibe.

2009 saw the inaugral Tatton Triathlon in Cheshire where I worked with a team of photographers to cover all bases. We were printing and selling on site but also hoping for on line website print sales as well as providing magazines and the events website with PR and editorial images.  In the space of five years I’d got my wings and covered many national and international events and had found the practice of lying down on the job, literally, that is  prone on the ground as runners came towards me, with a wide angled lens, the best way to get dramatic shots that athletes and other clients love.

click on the link below to find out how I honed the low down -close in technique and got the shots  that helped make my client a couple of million !

click on the link below to find out how I honed the low down -close in technique and got the shots that helped make my client a couple of million !

I  always go the extra mile and get into what I love to do and here that is what I did literally- shoes off, pants rolled up, actually kneeling in the lake shallows waiting as the athletes got back into the shallows , were able to stand  up splaashing and dripping deliciously and begin  to run into transition .

Long 200mm lens this time but kneeling in the lake -

Long 200mm lens this time but kneeling in the lake –

In the run section I either lay on the woodland floor as  for the shot below here or in the grass just below the brow of a big hill shooting athletes as they ran towards me and as always shouting encouragement which is what I do but also it means the runners are engaged with me and the camera and some even put on a show if they have enough energy left ! Athletes are not clearly not used to photographers doing it my way , I’ll do what I feel is necessary and I’m not remotely bothered if I look  a fool to some – seeing a bloke with a big camera lying prone on the bumpy track , it is a tad incongrous , unexpected and yet  I  often get a smile or surprise reaction and it may even give some of them a lift if they were struggling. I respect my subjects and love to intereact and support them with loud verbal encouragement for example – I can’t just point and shoot- my clients deserve better.

tatrun

It can be tough going laying  on uneven uncomfortable , often wet ,rough surfaces for a long time to get everybody as they are strung out running at their own pace but the effort is well worth it with the results you get. For the team leader that day Barry Derbyshire, for whom we were all working that day, he was most pleased with my opus because the extra effort and skill showed in all the great shots I got. He wrote the following unsolicited remarks :-

“The running shots by John Coxon,were great, lying flat on his stomach with a wide angle lens he was shooting up against the sky and produced fantastic results, check them out – he’s a pure pro and will be definitely working again for me. His Sunday running shots and the Saturday Swimming are the best.”
Posted on the Talk Photography forum  and then a personal message to me “10 out of 10 for the running pics on Sunday John, low angle exposure and your humour made the day – just can’t fault them and the massive depth of field with the wide angle was definitely the right choice – and full marks on your exposure” (Barry Derbyshire Professional Event photography)

sports physio

Either  a standard and wide angle lens are often best  to get the best PR and marketing images for clients but not everyone is entirely comfortable having a camera thrust at them by a stranger so for me socialbility and a willingness to engage with people is vital as is having a sense of humour.  You can take candids  were people are not aware of the camera  and get  closely framed of people doing their thing with a longer lens which keeps it natural because you are outside their personal space. Here I wanted a positive image of a physio at work on an athlete after the race. It’s literally a hands on personal job so in this case a remote disengaged shot with a long lens wouldn’t fit the brief. I wanted  get them a shot that would help them to market their services so needed to get in close with the trusty wide angle.   I first asked if it was OK as a professional courtesy and shot and chattered away but then made a silly joke which caused her to smile  but yet  not lose her focus on what she as doing.  Hey presto relaxed and positive image in the can.

Dare to be different and go  for other peerspectives even if you can;t stand heights.

Dare to be different and go for other perspectives even if , like me, you can’t stand heights.

You don’t have to always  follow the crowd– dare to take calculated risks and take opportunities when they arise and make the most off them. Be bold- a bit of cheek can help- and if you don’t dare to ask you don’t get.

Again here, going back to 2004, and my first major international sports commission. I was mixing with seasoned professionals and press photographers from the nation’s media. We were based in the Digital Media Centre, a very  tall flat  roofed building at the glorious  Salford Quays  near the race finish where we could bob in during the long day’s shift to get dry , download images and grab a coffee. The buildings concierge came in and offered us the chance to go up on the building’s roof but I was one of only three takers as I guess they were put off because  it was cold, windy and raining.  Up there it was even windier and a short parapet wall in front of a big drop but amazing panoramic views of the entire course- the other two photographers took a brief glimpse over, though the better of it and went back down- I stayed and took a series of shots. Shame it wasn’t during one of the elite races and not too busy looking down there but still some unique images.

( I actually came back a few weeks later, having phoned the buildings owners  and the concierge remembered me , the friendly chatty one. He took me  back  up on the roof this time in much better weather. I got some great, unique  shots and as a result, a big property agency found my work from that day in a Google search and paid me handsomely for the licensed use of a couple of unique dramatic panoramas of Salford Quays for a brochure they were  producing.)

The charismatic GB Triathlete, the "Don"  Tim Don - a shot I provided for him for his newsletter and sponsors.

The charismatic GB Triathlete, the “Don” Tim Don – a shot I provided for him for his newsletter and sponsors.

For portraits of individual athletes, again, especially if they are professionals and have a strong media presence and are themselves engaging perpsonalities ( which most of them are I have found ) ,  getting dramatic shots of them doing what they do best which capture also the atmosphere  and their gutsy determination is best done again in images which  put the person looking at the image in the frame.  Here, for this shot below of Sam ,  I  carefully chose a bend in the course, eased aside a barrier slightly with the permission of a marshal who knew I would never compromise the safety of an athlete, kneeled down as she ran at me and kerching.  (The professional event organisers  media top people were also triathletes and therefore know the necessity for keeeping what they call a “clean” course, i.e. no one actually on the track likely to impede or endanger the athlete and yet if you are careful & mindful as I am not for my own but the safety of others as paramount ,  it is still possible to get images like this where you appear to actually be on the course in front of the athlete.)

Inspirational triathlete NZ & Mum, the awesome Sam Warriner , on her way to gold in Salford World Cup,

Inspirational NZ triathlete  & Mum, the awesome Sam Warriner , on her way to gold in Salford World Cup.

BE THERE TO HELP-  thinking out of the box

Gwetting closer in more ways than one  – Wherever possible I welcome the opportunity to engage with international athletes and develop a friendly professional relationship with them  and , if I can help support and empower  them through both my photography but also by using my own social media presence and professional journalism to help promote their interests.  They may at points in their career be working themselves to tight margins , have not so much disposable income what with the costs of extensive travel and accomodation for example. For an ethical professional like myself profit is not the beginning and end of it all- being generous to people who you respect and admire works for me – it can lead you to be exploited ( as happened a couple of times – not athletes but a manager and a sponsor  for example) but will always give the benfit of the doubt until i learn otherwise.

My work turns up all over the place partly the result of my willingness to engage with people and support their interests.

My work turns up all over the place partly the result of my willingness to engage with people and support their interests.

I can provide them with cost effective images for their professional athlete websites, images for their sponsors and for product endorsements , set up and provide conntent for them on social media like Facebooks. I think of it as a partnership and a mutual benefit thing and I cherish dialogue and building positive professional realtionships with them. So, I will and have , for example, printed off shots and given them to athletes I admire as souvenirs or to give to their supportive families  for personal use. One such charming GB triathlete, who shall remain nameless, lives in the Antipodes but was born in my area and it was a priviledge one year to find and drop off  a souvenir DVD from my archives as a gift for her delightful grandparents. You know instinctively families of great athletes are supportive and proud so why not acknowledge that where you can. ( I still cherish the courteous and charming handwritten letter I got from that great person’s Grand Father – more than reward enough it delighted him)

stay around 7 keep your eyes peeled. Czech athlete Lucy had a togh day - left her box, shoes and inhaler. Image used later to raise awareness of Asthma & highlight positives.

I stick around after the circus has left  & keep my eyes peeled. Czech athlete Lucy had a tough day – left her box, shoes and inhaler. Image used later to raise awareness of Asthma & highlight positives.

Below a shot of Pip, another friendly and inspiring professional athlete. She wasn’t then a client but very friendly and supportive and I had sent her a link to a website album I’d published. Although this wasn’t a shot I’d have prefered from that opus, she asked for permission to use it, adapt it by adding the logos of her sponsors and her website address so she could use it as a fan card she’d get printed out in batches and carry to events with her to give out at events for example. She sentt me a signd version which I cherish.  Happy to help, think it is great creative thinking  and an example to other athletes of a creative way to self-market.

Pip Taylor (AUS) Pro Triathlete

Although my principle income is through professional photography I do have another string to my bow, as  a seasoned  and competent ediorial journalist providing  illustrated sports  reports  and features for various magazines and other media, something I have done , as a freelance  for some forty years. Anyone can take acceptable images but how you find different ways of using them, for the  purposes of others, helps set me apart. Athletes may now realise the value of engaging fans and others through social media and vibrant  proactive professional websites but that wasn’t always the case.  Some pros,  even today, remain techno phobes, have little grasp of the need to market themselves or  make effective use of the internet to reach their audience and encourage sponsor  and media interest . Most now get it and understand the idea of the “virtual ” relationship especially with fans. People like to feel they “know” sports professionals /sports celebrities   and many athletes now know the power of friendly tweets and Facebook activity and maintaining a personal blog  and have  that all important willingness to engage with people from all walks of life. Some have benefitted from my support and advice , others have frustrated attempts to get them more pro-active in self marketing and  especially on line self-marketing  usually blaming committments to training and other limp excuses ! Part of being a professional athlete is time management and I think it is vital to find some time to address your media presence if you want your career to develop!

I have set up Facebook pages for a number of wworlkd class athletes , produced customised Timeline cover shots and provided addtional content for them to set them on their way.

I have set up Facebook pages for a number of world class athletes  from various sports, produced customised Timeline cover shots  and provided addtional image  content and support  for them to set them on their way.

This is just a sample of one of many Facebooks I have set up for pro athletes, here  for a guy who was  really dismayed at his inability to attract sponsor funding so he commissioned me to cover  his appearance at the National Cycling Centre, Manchester Velodrome during an international meet. I know that there is a causal link between sponsor involvement and an athletes ability to be proactive in raising their media profile. Again there I was, with the trusty wide angled lens , track side, in poor light but using flash and the “panning” technique to get the high impact shots I needed to help him out. But the endeavour was hampered from the start with communication difficulties   we never got over as I think the guy also worked in his family’s business but crucially it seems to me, rarely even looked in his in box or went online. Charming guy, keen to raise his profile  and  yet, to be honest I don’t actually know if he is still competing. The media needs to be fed stuff and you can’t drive  forward unless you are prepared to put something of yourself in the tank for people like me to work with.

PUTTING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS TO GOOD USE –

While you can get good shots as an amateur from events you attend as a fan it is nearly always hard to get close enough to get great pictures unless you get accreditation which enables you to get nearer to the action. To get media accreditation at major events I often do this on behalf of a not-for-rofit  global sports news website ,Women Sport Report .Com with whom I  share the  mission to try to redress the lack of parity women sports enjoys in the media . I provide reports either based on press releases I have been emailed and illustrate them from my own archives over a range of sports.  I also translate , for example, press releases from Spanish and thus help to promote Argentine hockey. Sometimes I can use this to help promote the interests of my clients, other times athletes I admire but do not actually work for. Ocassionally my report has been the cover story and hence –

My all time favourite client, and great  friend, former World Champion & Olympian triathlete Michelle Dillon- front cover and feature for her   celebrating her coach of the year award .

My all time favourite client, and great friend, former World Champion & Olympian triathlete Michelle Dillon- front cover and feature for her celebrating her coach of the year award .

Not a client but a multi Paralympic Gold medalist track cycling record breaker now Dame Sarah Storery I greatly admire and happy to do my bit unofficially to celebrate her achievements in images and through my journalism.

Not a client but a multi Paralympic Gold medalist track cycling record breaker now Dame Sarah Storery I greatly admire and happy to do my bit unofficially to celebrate her achievements in images and through my journalism.

World's best hockey player, Luciana Aymar. A great admirer of  her, the game & Argentine Hockey I have helped promote the team for a few years on a voluntary basis with reports translated from Spanish and with images from my archives.

World’s best hockey player, Luciana Aymar. A great admirer of her, the game & Argentine Hockey I have helped promote the team for a few years on a voluntary basis with reports translated from Spanish and with images from my archives.

 SPOOKY CO-INCIDENCE – DO YOU MAKE YOUR OWN LUCK ?

Sometimes lying down on the job brings surprising results , none more than the shot of me lying by the roadside at the start of this epic blog entry , which was taken by a colleague  ( who was standing behind  a specator barrier ,  during the Half Ironman at Sherbourne in Dorset and only my second triathlon as an accredited photographer.) I had no idea who the rider was in the sh0t but found out later because of a string of co-incidences. Following the event I covered the London Triathlon the following year I  then found the contact details for some of the athletes , one of whom I thought was this athlete’s , Emma’s manager  but  in fact it was her Dad ! I phoned Australia and spoke to him and then subsequently exchanged emails. He was happy to use some of my images  for her website and was delighted to see them as my contact  was the first he had heard of her victory or seen confirmed in images due to the time difference.  Subsequently I showed him a sample of a new business card I was going to use , featuring that shot of me lying down on the job, and amazingly, turned out he recognised his daughter as the rider in the shot !

The formidable Australian professional triathlete emma Snowshill , small in stature but great in talent and committment.

The formidable Australian professional triathlete Emma Snowsill , small in stature but great in talent and heart.

As is my practice, where athletes and their management support me , use my services, that strikes up a positive professional relationship which I work hard at to keep going and providing further PR & marketing support either paid or as a gesture of good will and I follow the careers of those athletes with avid interest. I wrote a couple of reports based on a few press releases illustrated again with images from my own archives either for Women Sport Report or online magazines like Tri 247 . Emma was competing in the States at Desmoines along with my client and friend Michelle  and which was duly published and as again is my practice, I sent a link in an email to both athletes. Ironically when Emma’s dad read my detailed report, a mixture from three sources plus my own experience and knowledge base, he was  actually convinced I had actually been there and asked me if I could get some shots of her when she competed in a subsequent race in the USA. Quite flatering of course when I had to tell him I wasn’t actually in the States as he had no idea that I was a journalist too up till that point !

NEVER THROW ANY IMAGE AWAY – KEEP THEM IN WELL ORGANISED FILING SYSTEM AS YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN SOMEONE MIGHT HAVE A USE FOR THEM !

I think it was a year later after shooting this ITU World Cup Triathlon , which Liz won, that one of her sponsors contacted me, an innovative company in Australia who had a unique product which mimicked training at altitude and they wanted this and another shot to use on their company website as Liz was endorsing their product and always happy to help in marketing  supplying appropriate images from my archives for  emerging companies or working on site for them.

GB's Liz Blatchford , World Champion triathlete based in Australia but born in the North West of England

GB’s Liz Blatchford , World Champion triathlete based in Australia but born in the North West of England

CONCLUSION – If you are looking to go professional or a pro looking to extend your client reach my motto would be -Don’t ask what’s in it for me but what’s in it for them.

I also think that if you are looking to help promote the interests of others on the web through website content and content for social media  you ought to practice what you preach and be pro-active on those platforms yourself, present yourself as ethical, sociable and willing to interact with others. You can try to fake it but my guess is that if you aren’t genuine and honourable , you are going to be found out so I think being yourself is a must. I don’t declare a passion for photography , it is just something I am driven to do , with heart and soul, and one of the ways I communicate .

I never joined a camera club, never destructively criticised anyone elese’s photos  and I don’t over reflect on my own stuff or think of it as art. I don’t look at anyone else’s stuff with envy, don’t copy any style or school  – I’m just happy to do things my way – if it fits the purpose of my clients  the images have done their job.  My livelihoo0d depends entirely on meeting the photography needs of others and whether that pays well or not so well I am driven to do the best I can for them whatever it takes whoever they are .

John Coxon Photographer NW England

Further Reading ? More ideas and the way I do things, how far I put myself out, what you need to be prepared to do for your clients ,  and the story of how I helped make one of my sports photography clients a couple of million with a few of my shots  here The Big Million Shoot

(also check other blog entries by categories for more tips on photography and marketing effectively. )

I hope you have found this blog entry useful if you have an interest in photography and why not visit and like my business Facebook page  My Facebook Page and keep an eye on what I am doing and for further photography and related business ideas. I am very much a WYSIWYG professional and happy to be of service for others but I won’t endorse or support any product,individual or  enterprise with PR & marketing support if I don’t believe in them  myself and what they are trying to do. If you like what you have read here and feel I can help meet your photography needs with my range of skills contact me any time 24/7 /365 via my mobile 07989 300104 , by e mail johncoxon.com@gmail.com or via Facebook or Twitter message  Twitter johncoxonmedia and I will get back to you.

 

5 Responses to “PR & MARKETING SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY – THE LOW DOWN”

  1. so much superb info on here, : D.

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